Extraverts May Win The Battle, But Neurotics Win The War

This week, we’re digging into the filming for the first two modules of our leadership development series. I’ve been manning our bootstrapped teleprompter so this has pretty much been my position for the last day or so:20140709-123400-45240743.jpg

So far, most of our filming is for the first module  – Pop the Hood – covers the use of personality assessments to build better teams, personality research is top of mind.

Only seems right to throw it back to a guest post I did over at Fistful of Talent a while back on some new research showing that we may not have considered the full range of outcomes that comes with extraversion and neuroticism in the workplace. Here’s a teaser…

While we may be entering the age of the introvert (anyone read Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain?), extroverts have long been cashing out on the benefits of their personality.  Nothing new, right? Extraverts are easy to spot. They:

  • enjoy being the center of attention,
  • often think out loud,
  • tend to be socially dominant, and
  • draw energy from social events

If, to you, that describes the most annoying folks in your office, you might be an introvert.  Extroversion helps explain some of the behaviors folks engage in that help them succeed: they’re vocal about their achievements, their social dominance will look like “taking charge,” and they will get more face-time and words in during meetings—which may help offset the chattiness that gets them off task around the water cooler. Sounds like mostly good stuff!

Neuroticism (emotional instability), on the other hand is often thought of as the dark spot on a personality inventory.  New research says that may not be the full story…Check out the full post here.

Comments

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